EASI CORPORATE BUSINESS PLAN

 

Table of Contents

 

1.0 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY..............................................................2

 

2.0 PLANNED SERVICES...............................................................................2

2.1 SHELTER FACILITY...................................................................................2

2.2 COLLABORATION WITH OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS........................3

2.3 CASE MANAGEMENT..............................................................................4

2.4 PSYCHO SOCIAL WELLNESS SERVICES................................................ 4

2.5 LEGAL ADVOCACY AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE...................................4

2.6 FOLLOW-UP SERVICES............................................................................5

2.7 COMMUNITY EDUCATION......................................................................5

 

3.0 THE MARKET............................................................................................6

 

4.0 AGENCY ADMINISTRATION..................................................................10

4.0.1 The Board of Directors......................................................................10           

4.1 KEYS TO ACHIEVE EASI ORGANIZATIONAL SUCCESS…......................11

4.2 EASI ORGANIZATIONAL OBJECTIVES....................................................11

 

5.0 EASI ORGANIZATIONAL NEEDS SUMMARY..........................................12

5.1 Start-up Administration Staff................................................................12

5.2 Administrative Office Spac1e................................................................13

5.3 Housing/Shelter......................................................................................14

5.4 Staffing.....................................................................................................14

5.4.1 Phase I...................................................................................................14

5.4.2 Phase II..................................................................................................14

 

6.0 EASI Organization Budget………………………………………….......................14

    6.1 Capacity Building Operations Current Budget(pre-op) …......……...14

    6.2 Protected Residents Proposed Start-up Budget………………........….15

    6.3 Protected Residents Proposed Admin Phase I…………………............15

    6.4 Protected Residents Non-residents & Prop. Admin. Phase II…......16

7.0 Key Indicators for Quality Services Provision……………….............……...17

    7.1 Outcome Statements…………………………………………….....................….17

 

References………………………….............................………………………………………19

 

1.0 ORGANIZATIONAL SUMMARY

Elder Abuse Services, Inc. (EASI) is a non-profit, 501 (c) (3) registered, social services agency serving the Central California region. EASI’s mission is dedicated to providing emergency shelter, victim advocacy and coordinated case management services to victims of severe elder abuse in the Fresno/Madera region.

 

2.0 PLANNED SERVICES

Elder Abuse Services, Inc. will coordinate with first responders: human services providers, law enforcement, government agencies, and health care services to provide top tier crisis intervention services. Currently, some broad gaps in services exist that impinge upon elder abuse victims’ safety. Gaps include a lack of appropriate emergency shelter resources for those victims who have no safe housing options. Additionally, psycho-social wellness services to help heal from the emotional trauma of elder victimization and prevent further victimization are weak in the Fresno/ Madera area. Moreover, victims of elder abuse need more adequate legal advocacy services when a case of elder abuse is being adjudicated.  EASI’s reputation as experts regarding elder victimization allows us to continue to provide insight and advising services to local authorities and the community at large.

 

2.1 SHELTER FACILITY

Initially, EASI intends to provide a six bed confidentially located shelter. Alternatively, EASI will contract with local providers of senior housing services to use empty beds in their facilities. EASI will provide comprehensive crisis intervention and case management services for up to ninety days to female victims of elder abuse. We recognize that males are also victimized, however at a much lesser rate than females. Because of limited resources and communal living, initially, the shelter will house only females. To serve male victims of abuse, initially, before expansion, EASI will develop relationships and contract with local board and care homes for elders where male victims will receive safe housing and staff will make all other EASI services available to them. EASI will develop cooperative relationships with residential care facilities for the elderly, so that all elder abuse victims needing assisted care will receive shelter and care, along with access to other case appropriate EASI services, at our shelter or at off-site assisted care facilities. The EASI shelter and our off-site facilities will be staffed twenty-four hours each day, seven days each week. Staff will provide the resources for residents’ day-to-day living activities as well as case management coordinated with other service providers, psycho-social wellness and legal advocacy to address the specific needs of each shelter resident. Regardless of their location, each client will receive services to ensure his/her highest level of independent functioning.  Ultimately, clients will be assisted in finding or re-establishing the resources necessary to have a safe, nurturing long-term home to which he/she will move when leaving the EASI shelter or our off-site facility.

 

2.2 COLLABORATION WITH OTHER SERVICE PROVIDERS

Elder abuse victims will be referred to EASI from: law enforcement, county departments of social services (Adult Protective Services and other offices), other senior social services providers, medical care staff, mental health staff, homeless shelters, other community resource providers, churches, the general public, and self-referrals. EASI has already built relationships with many of the service providers in Fresno and Madera counties. We will continue to reach out to foster the strong collaborative interaction needed to prevent severely abused elder victims from falling through the cracks, as many now do because of the gaps in services.

 

EASI will have twenty-four-hour staffing of a call-line to receive and evaluate referrals. When an elder victim is identified as needing EASI’s shelter or alternate residential care, staff will make contact with the victim to facilitate: an initial assessment to determine the appropriateness of the victim for EASI’s services; the gathering of necessary documents from the victim’s current home; safe separation from the violent relationship; physical, social and mental health screening (including a TB test); and, safe transport to the EASI shelter or alternate assisted care shelter. EASI staff will complete a comprehensive intake procedure for each resident twenty-four hours following the victim’s entering the EASI shelter/assisted care shelter. Part of this initial process will be working with the elder victim to begin to construct a plan for change. This will include access to necessary resources and personal change goals to achieve empowered, independent functioning at the highest possible level after the resident departs from the EASI shelter.

 

2.3 CASE MANAGEMENT

During each residents’ stay at the EASI shelter or at an alternate care facility, our case management staff will assist each resident with securing the following necessary resources: clothing; personal and health care items; financial resources; transportation; legal counseling, mediation services; employment or re-training (if appropriate); psycho-social wellness services; and, future housing options. The EASI case management staff will liaise with other service providers to coordinate appropriate additional resources for the client, apply for entitlements and necessary goods and services to increase the client’s capacity to be as self-sufficient as possible.

2.4 PSYCHO-SOCIAL WELLNESS SERVICES

An essential goal of EASI’s Psycho-social Wellness Services is to address the emotional trauma of the elder person resulting from abuse inflicted by someone whom he/she trusted and, probably, relied upon for care and support. The fracture of the trust and infliction of harm can be devastating and cause a significant loss of functioning. EASI’s services will educate seniors about the dynamics of abusive relationships, the perpetrator’s tactics, what makes a senior vulnerable, recovery options and the implementation of the victim’s chosen options for change. Victims will be provided with a safe, nurturing environment within which to talk about the harm done and his/her feelings in reaction to that. Victims will be encouraged to build relationships with other shelter guests to experience healing together and, possibly, maintain on-going mutually supportive relationships. EASI’s staff will guide elder victims through the growth process to recovery and give them coping tools for psycho-social support to heal and empower them and prevent them from falling prey to future victimizations. 

 

2.5 LEGAL ADVOCACY AND RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

In addition to victim legal advocacy, a unique component of EASI’s services will include the option of restorative justice as an alternative to the retributive justice response in most criminal cases. The criminal justice system must agree to this prosecution alternative for it to be offered by EASI and its collaborative partner, Fresno Pacific University’s Center for Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution. Restorative justice works to encourage the perpetrator to acknowledge the harm inflicted upon the victim and the community. The objective is to have the perpetrator apologize, provide agreed upon restitution, and work diligently to end his/her abusive behavior. The victim must be able to accept the perpetrator’s apology and restitution, to forgive and be willing to also participate in creating healthy changes in the relationship. The goal is to repair the harm and violation in the relationship, facilitate new, healthy interactions between the former perpetrator and victim, and create a relationship in which the elder’s needs are addressed. This is a vital option in many situations of elder abuse because often the victim wants a healthy relationship with the perpetrator. Additionally, the victim is often dependent on the relationship with the perpetrator as a resource to assist with living independently, outside of a care facility.

 

2.6 FOLLOW-UP SERVICES

EASI will provide follow-up care after each guest leaves the shelter. If desired by the client, EASI will continue to be a source of stable support. Former guests will be contacted by the case management staff 30 days, 120 days, and as needed following their exit from the shelter. Staff will offer additional referrals, as appropriate, recognizing that access to necessary resources and social inclusion are two factors needed to insulate an elder from additional victimization. Additionally, staff will reinforce the elder survivor’s right to live with dignity and peace.

 

2.7 COMMUNITY EDUCATION

Elder abuse is a serious family problem in need of a community response. That community response is crippled by the general public’s poor awareness and insight about elder abuse. Many people do not know that elder abuse even happens, that family members could do such heinous acts to an elderly family member or that if elder abuse does occur, it usually goes unreported and unaddressed.

 

Very few people (public and professionals) understand the fact that some elder abuse victims live in homes where their safety is gravely threatened and virtually no appropriate emergency housing resources exist to ensure their safety. The elder may live in a home owned by him/herself, yet often this home has been occupied and controlled by another family member who is overpowering and exploiting the elder. The elder often feels incapable of preventing this person’s entry to their own home, resulting in the elder feeling and being at risk of harm. Another, more common scenario occurs when an elder is moved out of his/her home into the home of a family member ostensibly because the elder is no longer able to care for him/herself independently. In this decision, the elder loses his/her home, is probably pooling monetary resources with the family member, and becomes reliant on the family member for care and resources as s/he ages. This is a common situation for abuse and exploitation because the elder has lost independent control of his/her resources, including housing, and is vulnerable because of the reliance for care on the family member who is the abuser.

 

The public’s and professionals’ lack of adequate knowledge of these common situations of vulnerability justifies the need for the community education services EASI currently provides. We teach and raise awareness through educational presentations to service clubs, employee groups, church groups, senior citizen centers, and at community health and information fairs. In addition, we inform folks about EASI’s proposed services thereby raising community support for EASI’s current work.

3.0 THE MARKET

The Central California region lacks adequate resources needed to specifically serve elder victims of abuse who are at imminent risk of harm and in need of emergency shelter combined with comprehensive crisis intervention services. Currently, when an elder’s home is unsafe, alternatives might include a battered woman’s shelter, homeless shelter, voucher to a low-cost motel, or the home of a friend or family member. A battered women’s shelter is only available if the victim is a woman who is being abused by an intimate partner. Battered women’s shelters and homeless shelters do not usually provide services to meet the special needs of victims of elder abuse. Other residents in these communal living facilities are usually younger women with small children and men who are homeless. There may be a large amount of noise, and a lack of privacy and feeling of safety, thereby creating more stress for the elder. Often residents of these shelters are required to perform physical labor within the facility, and be outside of the shelter facility during daytime hours, two more problems for elders. A voucher to a low-cost motel cannot assure safety from the perpetrator nor services for ending the abuse. The victim is likely to experience social isolation and be very vulnerable to other predators while staying in a motel. Finally, the home of a friend or family member may, profoundly, exacerbate isolation of the elder from needed social contacts and services as the rules of “family privacy” and “taking care of one’s own business” prevail. Most importantly, family members or friends may not keep the victim’s whereabouts secret and may facilitate contact between the victim and the perpetrator, putting the victim at severe risk of harm. The proposed EASI shelter/alternate assisted care and EASI’s comprehensive services will provide a critical need for these types of abused elders in the Fresno/Madera region.

 

According to a study of the National Center on Elder Abuse (NCEA), there are as many as six million cases of elder abuse in the United States, annually. The same study concludes that 11 percent of all elder abuse cases in the U.S. occur in California. Therefore, regarding elder abuse, California has the dubious honor of leading the nation. Additionally, according to the Elder Abuse Daily, 11% of Fresno and Madera Counties residents, 60 years of age and older, have experienced some form of elder abuse, constituting a total of 16,064 victims.

 

EASI completed a comprehensive feasibility study of the Fresno and Madera regions in 2010 which assessed the target population. This study also included a survey of elder assessments by experts in the field, and by local demographic statistics. The study found that the Central San Joaquin Valley is one of the most culturally diverse areas in the nation, with more than 70 ethnicities represented and more than 105 languages spoken. It is anticipated that over the next twenty years there will be a significant increase and diversification of the elder population (Central California Institute for Healthy Aging, 2008). Of the 58 counties in California, Fresno County ranks eighth among those having the highest percentage of elders living below the national poverty level in 2006 (Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics, 2006). “In California 11.5 percent of older adults are below the federal poverty level (California Health Interview Survey, 2005). Although on the surface it appears that a small percentage of elder Californians are in poverty, a closer examination reveals that poverty rates are much higher for elders who reside in the Central Valley” (Miltiades & Flores, 2008, p 2).

 

When an elder is a member of a non-white ethnic group or living in poverty she/he is likely to be isolated from service providers who can identify and intervene in violence inflicted upon the elder. Additionally, the elder is less likely to trust others. Poverty and social isolation make the elder more dependent upon others for resources. This dependence provides an entry path for others to exploit the few resources (such as housing) the elder does have. Dependence also prevents the elder from doing anything to stop the violation once it has begun because the elder concludes that the harm is the price she/he must pay for whatever assistance/resource the perpetrator is providing. EASI recognizes the significant complications poverty and ethnic diversity inflict upon elder abuse and will address these risk factors when providing services.

 

EASI recognizes that ethnicity can be a strength as it can create social support, functional norms, a person’s identity and self-value. EASI is fully committed to ensuring that all our resources and services are ethnically sensitive, inclusive, and will communicate the value and celebration of each person’s identity. EASI will continue to reach out to the various ethnic communities, leaders, and service providers to provide elder abuse community education and culturally specific services.

 

Approximately 120 cases related to elder abuse are referred to Adult Protective Services agencies in Fresno and Madera Counties, annually. Females are more likely than males to be victimized throughout their lives. This is also seen with elder abuse where females account for approximately 63% of the victims. In 31% of reported cases the abuse was solely emotional, while 21% of the cases included physical abuse. Studies prove that approximately 90% of the perpetrators of elder abuse are family members, making the need for safe, confidentially located alternative crisis housing even more acute.

 

Unfortunately, in our society it is difficult to secure an accurate determination of the exact number of cases of elder abuse. One study estimated that only 1 in 14 cases of elder abuse is ever reported, while another study indicated that reports are as few as 1 in 23 cases. Lack of reporting of elder abuse has multiple contributors. One cause is that society protects family privacy, keeps family problems within the confines of the family and attributes shame to families that have any type of dysfunction. The abusive family becomes increasingly isolated because of the shame of the dysfunction. The power of the perpetrator is enhanced, and the victim becomes profoundly helpless. The message the victim receives is that she/he is the cause of the problem. This victim blaming is reflected in many aspects of our society and creates a barrier to resolving the violence.

 

Many of today’s elders came of age at a time when one established him/herself by “pulling him/herself up by their boot straps.” Independence and self-sufficiency was the acceptable norm. Any essence of dependence, ineffectiveness, or victimization was evidence of a defect or failure as a human being. Thus, contemporary elders are highly unlikely to report any harm perpetrated by their family members. They are motivated to protect, not harm, all family members, even when they are being harmed by them. If others know a family member is behaving in a heinous manner, they may be concerned about the damage to their image or their family image. Many of today’s elders, especially females, are socialized to endure their suffering and give endlessly to other family members, even if they are being exploited or harmed by them.

 

These factors keep victims silent in their victimization. The longer the violation continues, the more severe and frequent the violence becomes. Elder victims, who may be frail to begin with, are put at exponentially increasing levels of risk. These factors, also, prevent the general public and even some professionals from recognizing, reporting or intervening in elder abuse. For these reasons, EASI recognizes that it is essential to provide education to the professional and general community.

 

EASI has been providing community education since its beginning. Given that many EASI members are educators and students, we acknowledge the necessity of education as a tool for change through: the raising of awareness and ending misinformation, informing about existing resources, identifying needed resources, encouraging personal involvement in elder abuse intervention, and motivating folks to join EASI’s efforts to end elder abuse. EASI will maintain trained volunteer staff to provide education and seek funding to allow stable, trained, paid staff positions for extensive community education services. We realize that as elder abuse increases with the expanding and aging elder population, and as the public becomes more aware of elder abuse, the public demand for information will increase. EASI must secure needed resources to enthusiastically meet this demand. Thus, EASI will have a unique constellation of services. The restorative justice services are modeled after elder abuse restorative justice programs operating in Edmonton and Waterloo, Canada. The Sacramento Safe House (in California) provides emergency shelter for elders, though it does not provide comprehensive case management with restorative justice, psycho-social wellness, and legal services as is the plan for EASI’s clients. The few other elder abuse shelter and crisis intervention programs in the U.S are provided in conjunction with other elder services like: Alzheimer care, assisted living, and nursing services. Thus, EASI’s unique comprehensive case management model would be innovative and cutting edge for the US. 

                                                                             

4.0 AGENCY ADMINISTRATION

EASI has never, yet, had the funding to have paid staff. Thus far, in the life of our organization, all work has been done by volunteers. The numbers of volunteers who have been involved demonstrate that there is a significant commitment among many community members to open a shelter for victims of elder abuse. EASI has a high priority to, always, make good use of the investment of time and energy of volunteers.

 

All EASI policies have been constructed and put into operation by the EASI Board of Directors following the guidelines of the EASI By-Laws. These by-laws can be seen in the Appendix. The By-Laws direct that the Board should consist of no more than 15 members at any time.

4.0.1 The Board of  Directors                                                                                                                        

The EASI Board typically has included local citizens with expertise in the disciplines of gerontology, elder social services, elder care, criminology, psychology, social work, sociology, elder abuse, education, victimology, and health care. Their expertise will continue to provide needed direction as EASI services are developed, put into place and executed by staff who will be hired. The EASI Board is always looking to expand and diversify its membership to include others with additional appropriate expertise.

 

4.1 Keys To Achieve EASI  Organizational Success

a) Maintain a strong, cohesive, active Board of Directors who possess applicable skills and are solely focused on fulfilling the EASI mission.

 

b) Ensure that EASI’s services respond to the needs of abused elders, by interacting with collateral agencies and the broader community. EASI will meet the requirements for raising awareness regarding elder abuse and creating social change to prevent elder abuse and expand needed services toward the empowerment of elders.

 

c) To be compliant with its mission, EASI will annually insure that its operations will be evaluated by an outside objective researcher to honestly and scientifically assess its efficiency and efficacy.

 

d) Develop strong collaborative relationships with other senior and family violence service providers.

 

e) Design and implement strict financial controls and accountability to ensure that all agency resources are used with utmost efficiency and effectiveness.

 

f) Involve the community as advisors, donors, volunteers, and consumers of community education and other needed services.

 

4.2 EASI Organizational Objectives

a) Secure sufficient funding, start-up, operational and service expansion needs.

 

b) Create crisis shelter services focused on the needs of victims of elder abuse, providing safe, confidential housing for up to 90 days and comprehensive services to assist the elder with ending the violence in her/his life so she/he can live in dignity and peace.

 

c) Maintain a strong, cohesive, active Board of Directors who insure the smooth operation of the organization and its long-term viable functioning. The Board determines agency policies, facilitates fundraising events, constructs grant proposals, and facilitates efficient and effective use of all agency resources.

 

5.0 EASI ORGANIZATIONAL NEEDS SUMMARY

                                                               

5.1 Administration Activities

 

The initial need is to secure funding to hire one, or one and one half, paid staff to build the organizational capacity. As stated earlier, all accomplishments thus far in the history of our organization, have been achieved with the labor of volunteers. This is impressive considering that it has been in existence for nine years and has an increasing amount of community education services provided, an ever-expanding presence in and influence on the community, an ever expanding support system and list of officials who have declared their support through documentation in letters of support, an ever increasing bank balance, and a recent financially successful major fundraiser (Seniors Telling Amazing Real-Life Stories: S.T.A.R.S. in 5/2015).

 

We are currently developing collaborative plans to secure the use of off-site facilities so as to provide the full range of EASI’s services for abused elders needing immediate assisted care and protection. Concurrently we are also developing plans to find shelter property and funding to support regular full-time and part-time staff who will be hired and trained to serve shelter and off-site clients. The Board will work with staff to develop and execute the following steps toward opening and operating the EASI shelter, called the S.T.A.R. (Seniors Transitioning from Abuse to Restoration) facility and other protective residential options:  1) Build and maintain relationships with local people who will assist with the development and expansion of EASI services, including local seniors, private business owners and staff, senior services providers, public/government officials and service providers and  members of the community at large. These relationships are needed for local authorization and support to operate elder abuse intervention services. Concurrently, explore local properties available for location of the shelter facility and local senior housing providers who EASI will contract for alternate  crisis residential services in the Fresno/Madera region; 2) Research and determine the best funding options for EASI operation and write proposals and structure agreements that will result in the award of necessary funds; 3) Identify those services which are in the greatest need and which, realistically, can be provided within EASI’s resources; 4) of the residential options  available, determine which best suits EASI’s needs; 5) work with local  collaborators, to purchase, lease, arrange and complete all legal transactions involved with the purchase, leasing of the property or managing alternate residential options; 6) concurrently, build relationships and agreements with local contractors to secure donations of labor and materials to complete all needed rehabilitation of  properties as required by code regulations and to suit the needs of its residents ; 7) involve the public, local businesses, and volunteers to acquire furnishings, appliances, equipment, implements, and resources needed for the residents and EASI staff. 8)concurrently, complete shelter and comprehensive services protocols and operational policies, along with expanding staff and volunteer training curricula to include training; 9) hire and train Phase I staff to initiate provision of victim services.

 

5.2 Administrative Office Space

Appropriate office space is required for the organization to administratively operate, grow, and have visibility in the community. The administrative office space will serve as the organization’s main office. This location will be the “public face” of the organization to help conceal the confidential location of our shelter and alternate residential sites. Administrative office space will require furnishing with office furniture and equipment. In addition, we will require utilities such as electricity, internet, television, and telephone service.

5.3 Housing/Shelter

The preference of the Board of Directors is to receive a donated property already furnished, for a shelter. If this does not occur, the Board will seek funding to purchase or lease a property. The motivation for property ownership is to avoid being under the influence of another entity and its priorities, which may, likely, hinder EASI’s ability to operate a shelter in keeping with the above stated purposes. Concurrently, EASI will also seek to find residential protection for its victims in existing facilities which can be used gratis for short term durations in the absence of an EASI owned facility. 

                                

5.4 Staffing

5.4.1 Phase I

In Phase I qualified staff will be hired and trained to fill the following positions: Executive Director, Residential Manager, four Residential Monitor Staff, a Case Manager, Licensed Psycho-Social Wellness staff person, Legal Advocacy staff person, Community Education/Outreach and Volunteer Coordination staff person, and Administrative Support staff.

 

5.4.2 Phase II

During Phase II, qualified staff will be hired and trained for adding the following positions: a Program Director to provide direct supervision of all services to clients, additional Administrative Support Staff, additional Case Managers, additional Residential Monitor staff, Non-Residential Program Manager, Non-Residential Case Managers, Psycho-Social Wellness facilitators for residential and non-residential clients, Legal Advocacy Supervisor, additional Legal Advocates, a Volunteer Coordinator, Volunteer staff, Community Education/Outreach/Research Program manager, Community Education/Outreach/Research staff and an Agency Resource Development/Marketing Director.

6.0 EASI ORGANIZATIONAL BUDGETS

 

6.1 Capacity Building Operation Current Budget (pre-operation):

The purpose of this capacity building phase is to continue to establish an organizational structure, project our community image, establish credibility, gather letters of support and Memoranda of Understanding (MOUs); and, seek funding for future activities in our subsequent phases of pre-operational development. We have already registered with the State of California as a 501(c)(3) organization and with the Internal Revenue Service receiving our official Employer Identification Number: 27-1663233. We will continue to maintain supplies of brochures and handouts (in English, Spanish and Hmong), MOUs, letters of support, inventory of existing allied services and a feasibility study (victim experiences and community needs). During this phase our fundraising will be focused on events and grants to support our administrative needs. The annual budget for these activities’ needs included office supplies, promotional materials and professional services and has ranged from about: $5,000 to $8,000. 

 

6.2 Protected Residents’ Proposed Start-Up Budget (pre-operation):

          Significant funding for laying the ground-work to be able to open our doors and accept limited number of clients for protected residence and support programs. This 6-month phase would include the hiring of key start-up personnel; creation of an operating protocol and a training syllabus. This budget would include the costs for:

-Personnel Budget: at $33,500 (Executive Director - $26,500;

-Administrative Assistance - $7,000);

-Operational Costs:  at $12,500 (rent – $7,000; office furnishings - $3,000; utilities, supplies, etc. - $2,500). 

-Total budget for this six months: $46,000.

6.3 Protected Residents’/Administrative Proposed Phase I Operational Budget:

This 12-month phase will involve hiring additional staff of four residential victim advocates and a secretary. This will allow EASI to admit clients up to capacity of six at any given time (24/7 up to three months each). Upon receipt of an operational budget a staff of seven persons will be hired. Immediate after being hired, the Residential Victim Case Advocate will receive 40 hours of professional training focused on elder abuse, social work case analysis, case management, and restorative justice medication. 

 

Program and Administrative Personnel Budget ($278,000)

Executive Director ($53,000)

Administrative Assistant ($29.000)

Four Residential Victim Case Advocates $44,000 X 4 = ($176,000)

Secretary ($20,000)         

Operating costs ($43,750)

Total Proposed Phase I Budget ($321,750)

         

6.4 Protected Residents’, Non-resident and Administrative, Proposed Phase II Full Operational Budget: This second operational annual phase will increase the staff to twelve persons, continue the protected residence facility services, and add an outreach service and non-residential protective services. The addition of the outreach services will extend all EASI’s services to all the Fresno/Madera Area, plus include protective non-residential services to utilize available rooms in existing facilities (e.g. assisted living centers) in concert with developed MOUs as tax write-off options for these facilities.

 

Program and Administrative Personnel Budget ($471,040)

 

Executive Director ($53,000)

Administrative Assistant ($29.000)

Marketing/outreach Director ($47,000)        

Program Director – residential and non-residential ($47,000)

Licensed Mental Wellness Supervisor ($48,000)    

Volunteer Coordinator – part time ($24,000)                             

Four Residential Victim Case Advocates $44,000 X 4 = ($176,000)

Secretary II at $13/hour ($27,040)         

Secretary I at $10/hour ($20,000)         

Operating Costs ($75,000)

Total Proposed Phase II Budget ($546, 040)

 

7.0 KEY INDICATORS FOR QUALITY SERVICE PROVISION

EASI has a commitment to provide quality services for the safety, well-being and dignity of elder victims of violence in the Fresno/Madera region. Services will be provided with a clear evaluation method that assesses both the inputs and client outcomes. Attention will be paid to the key indicators for the efficiency and efficacy of services that elder victims deserve.

 

A combination of highly trained and skilled staff will be sensitive to the unique needs of elder victims of violence in the Fresno/Madera region. Ultimately, the Board of Directors, administration, and direct services staff are committed to clear evidence that the resources expended do address the needs of clients and the community. This will be measured through conducting surveys of clients’ recovery and ending violence in their lives, surveys with collateral service providers, and in the Fresno/Madera community. Overall, the intended outcome is to promote, reinforce, and improve the quality of a victim’s life, free from any abuse and gaining the ability to live in peace and dignity at the highest level of functioning possible for each elder client.

 

7.1 Outcome Statements:

 

Outcome 1) – Housing -  elders at risk of harm from abuse will be provided up to 90 days of protected housing in confidentially located sites.

 

Outcome 2) Case Management - staff will complete comprehensive needs assessments, set change goals with the residents to provide: education, counseling, encouragement, and links to resources that can enhance clients to live free of violence and victimization.

 

Outcome 3) Psycho-social Wellness - qualified staff will complete a psycho-social health, functioning, and needs assessment with each resident, set goals for improved functioning, provide referrals to local expert professionals and facilitate EASI client treatment services (e.g. therapeutic support groups, therapeutic physical activities, art therapy and journaling, etc.).

 

Outcome 4) Legal Advocacy - staff will collaborate with District Attorneys and other legal professionals as an advocate for the elder victim. The EASI service component of restorative justice seeks to heal the harm in abusive relationships if the perpetrator and victim are capable of working toward this resolution and if this is in keeping with the criminal justice system’s handling of the case. EASI will partner with the restorative justice experts at Fresno Pacific University’s Center for Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution to provide restorative justice services.

 

Outcome 5) Non-residential services - staff will provide case management, psycho-social wellness services and legal advocacy to elder abuse victims who have our safe emergency housing to include the need to be safe from further harm, heal the resulting harm, achieve permanent stable housing, and end the threat of violence in their lives.

 

Outcome 6) Community education - Elder abuse is a largely unrecognized, under-reported, and highly under-served problem. Thus, our Staff will provide elder abuse education to professionals and the general public regarding the dynamics of elder abuse, the perpetrators motivations, barriers to service access and effectiveness, the needs of elder victims, and EASI’s services.     

 

References

 

California Health Interview Survey (2005), UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

 

Central California Institute for Healthy Aging, 2008.

 

Federal Interagency Forum on Aging Related Statistics, 2006.

 

Miltiades, B. H. & Flores, M. (2008) Aging in the San Joaquin Valley: Present Realities and Future Prospects, Central California Institute for Health and Aging, California State University, Fresno.

 

Seniors Telling Amazing Real-Life Stories: S.T.A.R.S. (2015) EASI fundraiser event.

© 2017 Elder Abuse Serivices, Inc

Elder Abuse Services, Inc.

PO Box 5058 

Fresno, California 93755

PHONE: 559-429-8620